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Attractions at Dybbøl Banke

  1. Kongeskansen (the King's redoubt)
  2. Redoubt IV
  3. Redoubt II
  4. Dybbøl Mill
  5. Dybbøl Banke History Centre
  6. Museum at Sønderborg Castle
  7. Mass graves
  8. Brohovedskansen (bridgehead redoubt)
  9. Barstenen (a great rock)
  10. Gendarmstien (the gendarm path)
  11. Coastal slope
  12. Stævningsskoven (coppice forest)
  13. Avnbjerg
  14. Arnkil
  15. Sandbjerg Castle
  16. Nydam Mose (marsh)

1. Kongeskansen (the King’s redoubt)

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Immediately after their victory in 1864, the Prussians decided to build a large defence works around Sønderborg. Kongeskansen – German redoubt 10 – was the first part of the construction. It was built over the remains of the Danish redoubts V and VI. However, the defences were never used, and in 1885 they were abandoned.

The name Kongeskansen (the King’s redoubt) was given to the redoubt at the Reunification in 1920. This was when King Christian X was received by the people of southern Jutland. As many as 50,000 people watched as the King was presented with an old Dannebrog (the Danish flag) by four young girls dressed in white.

Kongeskansen is now grazed by sheep so that it does not become overgrown with trees and bushes, and to keep the grass down so that people can easily walk around the redoubt.

2. Redoubt IV

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Redoubt IV was the strong redoubt to the rear of the Dybbøl position, with a total of 12 cannon. 

Only four of the cannon were in working order when, after six hours’ massive artillery bombardment, 2,400 men from the Prussian forces stormed the redoubt. The redoubt fell after just 30 minutes’ fighting.

After 1864 the redoubt was demolished and a German redoubt was built on the remains. The white marking shows the outline of the original Danish redoubt. The remains of the oldest concrete in Denmark, from 1864, can be seen in the redoubt.

In 1872 a 24m-high Prussian monument to the Battle of Dybbøl was raised on the concrete foundations of the blockhouse. The monument stood until May 1945 when it was blown up by unknown persons.

3. Redoubt II

Redoubt II was the only redoubt from which the Danish cannon could reach the German batteries at Broagerland. There was a good view over Vemmingbund from the redoubt. You can see where the German batteries were positioned in the area above the camp site near Gammelmark.

A memorial has been placed in the redoubt to the three soldiers who have since become symbols for both armies in the battle. The are lieutenants Johan Peter Anker and Carl Vilhelm Castenschiold, who in turn had command of Redoubt II, and Karl Klinke, a Prussian skirmisher. Klinke was killed when he tried to blow a hole in the palisade surrounding the redoubt.

4. Dybbøl Mill

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The existing Dybbøl Mill is the fifth mill on the site. The first was a timber mill built in 1744. The mill which stood here in 1864 was made of brick. However, it stood directly in the line of fire and was shot to ruins during the battle. The current mill was completed in 1936. The sails of the mill and the old grinder have been restored, and when the wind is right the mill works just as it did in olden times.

Since 1995, the Museum at Sønderborg Castle has organised exhibitions in the mill and the corn store.

Read more at museum-sonderjylland.dk

5. Dybbøl Banke History Centre

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Enter Dybbøl Banke History Centre and step straight back to the battle in 1864. Together with the soldiers in the trenches, you too can experience the tense wait for the signal to attack, seek cover in the redoubt blockhouse, and visit the barracks where the reserves live. You can also see a film about the war and the events leading up to it.

The distinctive building forming the framework of the History Centre was designed by architects Ernst Lohse and Michael Freddie. Their project won the architectural competition in 1990 and the Centre was officially opened by Queen Margrethe on the 128th anniversary of the battle in 1992.

Read more at museum-sonderjylland.dk

6. Museum at Sønderborg Castle

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Sønderborg Castle was built as a fort in the first half of the 13th century. The Danish King Christian II was imprisoned here from 1532 to 1549. In 1852-64 the castle was a Danish barracks and later a Prussian/German barracks until 1919. After the Reunification in 1920, the owner sold the castle to the Danish state.

The Museum has a comprehensive collection of original weapons, uniforms, paintings and other items from the wars in 1848-51 and 1864, from the period under German rule and from the Reunification.

Read more at museum-sonderjylland.dk

7. Mass graves

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Some of the soldiers who fell during the attack on 18 April lie in the mass graves. Both Danish and Prussian soldiers were buried together here. A total of 334 Danish and 28 Prussian soldiers lie in the four large graves. The injured who died at field hospitals after the battle were buried in cemeteries near churches in the local area. Throughout the entire Dybbøl area and on the Arnkil peninsular north of Sønderborg stand memorials at places where Danish and Prussian soldiers fell. Some of the memorial stones are in private gardens and along residential streets.

8. Brohovedskansen (bridgehead redoubt)

Brohovedskansen is close to Christian X’s bridge which today connects Sundved and Als. In 1864 the most important task for the redoubt was to protect two pontoon bridges which linked the Dybbøl positions with the Danish forces on Als.

Rowan, ash, apple and cherry trees as well as thorn bushes grow on the redoubt. All the trees are protected.